Tag Archives: mello music group

A Bonus Cut Feature: An Interview With DJ Soko

soko

By: Gus Navarro

Last week I was in New York City visiting a friend and was able to sit down with Michigan native DJ Soko, a current resident of Brooklyn. Soko has been involved in hip-hop for over ten years but his emergence onto the scene as an artist is still relatively recent. That being said, he has been extremely active on the 1’s and 2’s between DJ’ing at parties and for MC’s such as Journalist 103 and Kopelli. In 2010 he teamed up with Journalist 103 and Apollo Brown to form The Left. The trio put out Gas Mask, one of the most critically acclaimed hip-hop albums of the past five years. Soko is somebody that is very proud of where he is from and the particular sound and image that is associated with the Detroit hip-hop scene. On top of that, he is an artist that loves what he does and cares deeply for the integrity of his craft. It was a true honor to have the chance to sit down and talk with him about his experiences and passion for hip-hop.

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Album of the Week: “The City Under The City” by L’Orange & Stik Figa

city-under-the-city

L’Orange & Stik Figa 
The City Under The City
Mello Music Group, 2013

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Album(‘s) of the Week: “The Beauty In All” and “People Hear What They See” by Oddisee

Oddisee-the-beauty-in-all

This week Gus and I decided to share two, yes TWO, albums for our Album of the Week segment. They’re both from the brilliant mind of Oddisee and they’re both worth spinning, multiple times.

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A Reaction to Lord Jamar and His Inaccurate Take on Hip-Hop

By: Gus Navarro

This past week, Lord Jamar of Brand Nubian, offered up some provocative statements regarding issues of race, power, homosexuality and ownership in hip-hop during an interview with Vlad TV. His comments provide us with the chance to think critically about how hip-hop can and should be defined. There is much that goes into this definition and it is worth thinking long and hard about. As I began to reflect on this interview, it became clear to me that Lord Jamar’s comments are doing the social movement of hip-hop a disservice. Lord Jamar is simplifying hip-hop down to a black and white issue and I wholeheartedly disagree with this line of thought. Lord Jamar is taking away from understanding hip-hop as a worldview, how it has grown and what it can do for people. On top of that, he is slighting every hip-hop artist involved in creating what it is today. In light of these comments, we must break down what he is saying because of hip-hop’s significance around the world.

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